Theme 3: Nature & Wellness

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link


Thanks for joining the challenge! You’ve selected Theme 3: Nature and Wellness as your climate change challenge. This page contains additional information to help you answer your challenge question.


About nature and wellness

When we think of traditional cities, we think of skyscraper buildings, expansive road networks and the hustle and bustle of the streets, where nature and food-growing are not often the main elements that come to mind. However, nature and growing local food belong in cities too; both are critical to clean air and maintain healthy communities.

Forward-thinking cities are integrating both nature and food growing in more traditional and innovative ways. For example, green roofs that are home to pollinators are being used for community gardens. There are also many cases of low-impact developments (LIDs) that are helping to mitigate climate change impacts like excessive stormwater runoff. Additionally, including green infrastructure, like large tree canopies, help reduce the Urban Heat Island Effect, drastically lowering air temperatures and absorbing carbon dioxide.

Similarly, prioritizing growing local food helps cities increase food security, accessibility and availability, and reduces the carbon emissions associated with importing food. All things considered, the environmental, health and economic benefits of nature-infused cities that participate in the local food movement cannot be underestimated.


Challenge questions

5. Determine how we might increase resilience in Mississauga through innovative green spaces. Learn more


6. Determine how we might make Mississauga more food secure through the local food movement. Learn more



Thanks for joining the challenge! You’ve selected Theme 3: Nature and Wellness as your climate change challenge. This page contains additional information to help you answer your challenge question.


About nature and wellness

When we think of traditional cities, we think of skyscraper buildings, expansive road networks and the hustle and bustle of the streets, where nature and food-growing are not often the main elements that come to mind. However, nature and growing local food belong in cities too; both are critical to clean air and maintain healthy communities.

Forward-thinking cities are integrating both nature and food growing in more traditional and innovative ways. For example, green roofs that are home to pollinators are being used for community gardens. There are also many cases of low-impact developments (LIDs) that are helping to mitigate climate change impacts like excessive stormwater runoff. Additionally, including green infrastructure, like large tree canopies, help reduce the Urban Heat Island Effect, drastically lowering air temperatures and absorbing carbon dioxide.

Similarly, prioritizing growing local food helps cities increase food security, accessibility and availability, and reduces the carbon emissions associated with importing food. All things considered, the environmental, health and economic benefits of nature-infused cities that participate in the local food movement cannot be underestimated.


Challenge questions

5. Determine how we might increase resilience in Mississauga through innovative green spaces. Learn more


6. Determine how we might make Mississauga more food secure through the local food movement. Learn more


Discussions: All (2) Open (2)