Culture Master Plan

What can culture be?

Great cities are known for their architecture, busy public spaces, walkable neighbourhoods, public art, great shopping and good food. Having an exciting arts, culture and heritage scene brings people together to share unforgettable experiences.

The creative sector was the fastest developing sector in Ontario last year and contributed 12.2 billion to Ontario's economy. The City of Mississauga is committed to growing and supporting arts and culture, making Mississauga a place where culture and creativity can thrive. To do this, we are developing a new Culture Master Plan through discussions with residents, artists and Mississauga-based cultural organizations.

A Culture Master Plan will provide direction for investment in arts, culture and heritage. The plan will recognize strengths and identify gaps and opportunities to enhance Mississauga's quality of life and quality of place. We need your input and ideas to help shape the vision for arts and culture in Mississauga.

Get Involved!

There are lots of ways to share your ideas.

  1. Host your own community meeting! Invite others to take part and use this guide to discuss arts and culture at your own pace and in your favourite place.
  2. Spread the word using #SaugaCulture.
  3. Share the survey link (mississaugaculture.ca/survey) with your ten best friends.

The draft plan is expected by summer of 2017 with final approval by City Council by year-end.

Help make Mississauga the place you want to be!

What can culture be?

Great cities are known for their architecture, busy public spaces, walkable neighbourhoods, public art, great shopping and good food. Having an exciting arts, culture and heritage scene brings people together to share unforgettable experiences.

The creative sector was the fastest developing sector in Ontario last year and contributed 12.2 billion to Ontario's economy. The City of Mississauga is committed to growing and supporting arts and culture, making Mississauga a place where culture and creativity can thrive. To do this, we are developing a new Culture Master Plan through discussions with residents, artists and Mississauga-based cultural organizations.

A Culture Master Plan will provide direction for investment in arts, culture and heritage. The plan will recognize strengths and identify gaps and opportunities to enhance Mississauga's quality of life and quality of place. We need your input and ideas to help shape the vision for arts and culture in Mississauga.

Get Involved!

There are lots of ways to share your ideas.

  1. Host your own community meeting! Invite others to take part and use this guide to discuss arts and culture at your own pace and in your favourite place.
  2. Spread the word using #SaugaCulture.
  3. Share the survey link (mississaugaculture.ca/survey) with your ten best friends.

The draft plan is expected by summer of 2017 with final approval by City Council by year-end.

Help make Mississauga the place you want to be!

  • Community Arts Profile: Kat Runnalls

    7 months ago
    Profile katrunnalls 200x200

    We’re running a series of short interviews with Mississauga’s cultural thought leaders. We want to know what they think makes the city unique and how they are helping to move culture forward in Mississauga.

    This week, we chat with Kat Runnalls Vice-President of the Small Arms Society.

    Tell us a little bit about yourself.

    KR - I've been a Director of the Small Arms Society since 2013 and am currently Vice-President. The Small Arms Society is partnering with the City of Mississauga on the adaptive re-use of the Small Arms Building into a creative hub.

    I've held senior management positions... Continue reading

    We’re running a series of short interviews with Mississauga’s cultural thought leaders. We want to know what they think makes the city unique and how they are helping to move culture forward in Mississauga.

    This week, we chat with Kat Runnalls Vice-President of the Small Arms Society.

    Tell us a little bit about yourself.

    KR - I've been a Director of the Small Arms Society since 2013 and am currently Vice-President. The Small Arms Society is partnering with the City of Mississauga on the adaptive re-use of the Small Arms Building into a creative hub.

    I've held senior management positions with cultural services in various municipalities. I've managed cultural programs and facilities including galleries, studios, heritage sites/museums, theatre and performance spaces. I have extensive experience as a cultural planning consultant developing cultural plans and policies for municipalities. My work as a consultant has also included facility development and the adaptive re-use of heritage buildings.

    I was the Chair of the first Cultural Policy Steering Committee for the City of Mississauga in 2003 and have continued to volunteer in the sector.

    What makes Mississauga unique?

    KR - Mississauga is a unique urban centre which evolved as a series of amalgamated communities to become the largest suburb and now sixth largest city in Canada. Much of the increased density and growth has been in the transformation of agricultural lands, infill and brownfields into compact residential development including the creation of a downtown core.

    Mississauga is known for the preservation of green space and considered a safe city. The next and crucial challenge in moving from an essentially suburban edge city culture to a sophisticated urban centre, is to honour the integrity of the heritage villages and focus on creative place-making at the neighbourhood level through cultural development initiatives. Intentionally supporting creative entrepreneurs, artists, and innovators and ensuring the retention of new talent, ideas, and markets will lead to a more engaged, healthy and prosperous city.

    How would you make arts, culture and heritage better in the city?

    KR - The cultural-creative sector (arts, culture, heritage and the related creative industries) bring us value through innovation, talent, products and new markets. This sector and its importance to the economy is growing faster than many other sectors across Canada. It will be important for the City to embrace the cultural-creative sector as one of the most important economic drivers and significant contributors to prosperity, livability and global identity.

    The City can invest substantially more in the development of the creative economy by implementing tools to support cultural development horizontally across the City’s planning, economic, social and environmental policies and processes.

    One of these tools could be to set out a multi-year project plan across departments to prioritize new ways, strategies and mechanisms to leverage creative and cultural assets that strengthen the creative economy. Setting targets across departments would ensure Mississauga competes as a creative city with other major urban centres in Canada and supports and retains its creative talent.

    As the City transforms its planning systems to be more flexible and responsive and to create bridges across administrative silos, the municipal role can also focus on connecting and aligning more effectively to non-profit and private sector partnerships and initiatives.

    Establishing a permanent Cultural Development Advisory Committee will be an important mechanism to facilitate the connection to the creative non-profit and private sectors.

    Maximizing opportunities for the non-profit and private sectors to work collaboratively in developing and managing creative spaces will lay the foundation for retaining talent and attracting investment.

    In 10 years, what will arts, culture and heritage look like in Mississauga?

    KR - Mississauga is rated as one of the top ten creative cities in Canada and has transformed from an edge city with compact housing to a city of creative neighbourhoods. The city’s creative economy has grown significantly to compete with the top urban centres in Canada.

    There are a number of creative districts, creative spaces and entrepreneurial endeavours representing the diversity of each of the city neighbourhoods. Cultural resources and infrastructure in all neighbourhoods is enhanced through supportive grant funding, zoning initiatives, tax abatement measures, density bonussing and public benefit strategies. Cultural connections to park land, conservation areas and residential and land-use planning initiatives has created more sustainable and vibrant neighbourhoods.

    The City is known for its innovative temporary and permanent public art program with an emphasis on enhancing neighbourhoods and its green spaces. A successful community public art component engages artists with the community in the creation of works which add vibrancy and sense of place to each neighbourhood.

    A burgeoning cultural-creative sector live and work in Mississauga attracted by its affordable housing and inventory of live-work and co-working spaces, learning labs, incubator spaces. Retail, warehouse, manufacturing and light industrial spaces are used both permanently and temporarily for the creation of large scale works, storage, rehearsal, performance and exhibition. Cultural organizations, creative industries, and creative workers co-manage and program many spaces.

    Resource development strategies are in place across departments that support collaborative cross-sector projects, organizational sustainability and capacity building; creative infrastructure and spaces, and the retention of creative talent.

    How is your organization helping to push arts and culture forward in Mississauga?

    KR - The Small Arms Society is championing a community-driven plan to reinvent the heritage designated Small Arms Inspection Building as the first creative hub in Mississauga. This will facilitate connection, collaboration and creation across culture, arts, heritage, environmental sciences and technology.

    As partners with the City on program development, Phase I of the building will involve animating the south portion of the building for community gathering, learning and networking as well as performance, exhibition and celebration.

    We envision the intersection of individuals of all ages and ideas through cross-disciplinary endeavours. We will champion and celebrate emerging and established talents and facilitate the exploration of the boundaries of contemporary collaborative practice and innovation. We will encourage the retention and appreciation the heritage of the building, site, and people involved in its history.

    Phase II will provide flexible and defined spaces in the front or north spaces of the two-story portion of the building for resident artists/artisans, creative entrepreneurs, enterprises and non-profits and creative commercial endeavours.

    Working in partnership with the City and many other stakeholders across various sectors represents a remarkable opportunity to nurture talent and create a more sustainable and vibrant community in Lakeview with an essential connection to park land, conservation areas and residential and land-use planning initiatives.

  • DIY: Host Your Own Discussion Toolkit

    7 months ago
    Culturemasterplan 200x200

    Why host your own discussion?

    Your ideas and feedback will help the City of Mississauga build a vision and action plan to better support arts, culture and heritage in our city. We encourage you to be active members in helping shape a collective vision and supporting the ongoing conversation.

    What is a ‘host your own discussion’?

    Hosting your own group discussion can be as simple as having a small or large gathering of friends, peers, colleagues, neighbours, or strangers to answer questions and discuss ideas. We’ve made a simple step-by-step process that you can follow. There... Continue reading

    Why host your own discussion?

    Your ideas and feedback will help the City of Mississauga build a vision and action plan to better support arts, culture and heritage in our city. We encourage you to be active members in helping shape a collective vision and supporting the ongoing conversation.

    What is a ‘host your own discussion’?

    Hosting your own group discussion can be as simple as having a small or large gathering of friends, peers, colleagues, neighbours, or strangers to answer questions and discuss ideas. We’ve made a simple step-by-step process that you can follow. There are some key questions to discuss in your group, record your feedback and email it back to us. That’s it!

    The key to hosting your own group discussion is to have a comfortable space for everyone to meet and to facilitate a fun and open discussion. The Host Your Own Discussion Toolkit will help you organize your own discussion with a simple outline, discussion questions and instructions on how to report back.

    What you will need:

    • Comfortable, inclusive and accessible space for people in your group to gather (a café, your living room, a community centre, a library…)
    • The Toolkit (it might be useful to print a few copies so everyone can follow along)
    • Pens, paper, markers, post-it notes
    • Extra paper or laptop to take notes (having access to the internet/Wi-Fi may be useful)
    • Camera or smartphone to take photos
    • Whatever other creative items you want to support your own facilitation style

    Steps:

    1. Invite a group of people to get together. Find a comfortable place (maybe even have some snacks)
    2. Prepare materials and familiarize yourself with The Toolkit (background information, discussion questions, activities, how to report back and the amount of time you’ll need for each activity).
    3. Record your feedback, notes and ideas and email it back to us
    4. Share your photos online! #Saugaculture


    Record your feedback and email it back to culture.masterplan@mississauga.ca by May 12th 2017.

  • Community Arts Profile: Natalie Lue

    8 months ago
    Profile natalielue 200x200

    We’re running a series of short interviews with Mississauga’s cultural thought leaders. We want to know what they think makes the city unique and how they are helping to move culture forward in Mississauga.

    This week, we chat with Natalie Lue the Chief Executive Officer for the Living Arts Centre.

    Tell us a little bit about yourself.

    NL - I’m six months into my role as the Chief Executive Officer for The Living Arts Centre in Mississauga. Before relocating to Mississauga from Toronto, I was the Vice President, Production and Visitor Experience for the Toronto International Film Festival. Prior to... Continue reading

    We’re running a series of short interviews with Mississauga’s cultural thought leaders. We want to know what they think makes the city unique and how they are helping to move culture forward in Mississauga.

    This week, we chat with Natalie Lue the Chief Executive Officer for the Living Arts Centre.

    Tell us a little bit about yourself.

    NL - I’m six months into my role as the Chief Executive Officer for The Living Arts Centre in Mississauga. Before relocating to Mississauga from Toronto, I was the Vice President, Production and Visitor Experience for the Toronto International Film Festival. Prior to that, I held a number of key positions at Harbourfront Centre including Director of Facilities, Artistic Associate, and Director of Planning. I’m a graduate of Theatre Arts and was named a Cultural Leaders Lab fellow (a program collaboration between the Toronto Arts Council and Banff Centre), have been an arts council jury member, and participated on many arts and community boards.

    What makes Mississauga unique?

    NL - Mississauga is in a unique period of transformation and growth not only in numbers of residents and construction projects in the works but in the incredible engagement of its City Council and constituents in the development and promotion of arts, culture and heritage in the City. This commitment to a healthy arts, culture and heritage sector, will foster a welcoming and creatively vibrant community that celebrates and showcases us at our very best. Given the steady influx of newcomers from near and far to Mississauga, through celebration of arts, culture and heritage, our city has the opportunity to exemplify a civic identity of inclusivity in the same way that Toronto has become known as a city of diversity.

    How would you make arts, culture and heritage better in the city?

    NL - The exploration of arts, culture and heritage should be embedded in every aspect of life in Mississauga - from mandatory engagement through our school curriculum to ways to navigate and understand Mississauga better. Arts, culture and heritage events should be supported and artists encouraged in the same way that sports events are attended and sports teams are revered. Corporate or for-profit support of arts, culture and heritage groups should be incentivized and viewed as a sound investment in the City. Arts, culture and heritage funding should grow annually at a more aggressive rate over the next six years than currently proposed by the Culture Division with a mandate to make art, culture and heritage accessible and affordable and to fund multi-disciplinary collaborative projects. The Culture Division should invest in building capacity of existing and/or creating sustainable arms-length arts, culture and heritage service organizations. City Planning should mandate affordable “live/create” spaces in all new developments constructed in the City. The City should give over space in every civic community space to arts creation and expression.

    In 10 years, what will arts, culture and heritage look like in Mississauga?

    NL - In 10 years, every street sign, public building, new build, neighbourhood will be a canvas for art. Every public park and outdoor plaza will double as a performance space. Every child would have access to the arts (playing an instrument, participating in robust programs in schools and after school, camp programs, and attending local performances) throughout their school years. A citywide youth engagement in the arts program (i.e. a high school co-op programme that expands their volunteer service requirement and prepares them for entering the workforce and/or higher learning institutions) would be in place. The Living Arts Centre will have completed an expansion project, the AGM would have its own home, and Celebration Square would be animated year round thereby galvanizing the City Centre downtown core and responding to the growing need for professional performance and exhibition spaces to showcase the best in their field. As well, every municipal ward would have its own thriving community multi-disciplinary performance/exhibition space to support and encourage growth in the arts, culture and heritage sector and the work of emerging talent. An as yet defined, new type of “museum” celebrating the original settlers – the Indigenous people - would be under construction. Mississauga would be a Top 20 tourist destination with one of the largest annual international arts, culture and heritage festivals in the world.

    How is your organization helping to push arts and culture forward in Mississauga?

    NL - The Living Arts Centre’s sole purpose is to push arts and culture forward in Mississauga. Our vision is to enrich the quality of life within Mississauga and neighbouring communities through arts and culture. The Living Arts Centre, as a presenter and programming partner, is committed to developing and showcasing all art forms and to build capacity in the arts, culture and heritage community of Mississauga through collaboration. The Living Arts Centre also has aspirations to be recognized on the global stage as an innovator, discoverer and exhibitor of creative expression. The Living Arts Centre is dedicated to life-long learning and life-long engagement and enjoyment of arts, culture and heritage.

  • Community Arts Profile: Jazzmine Lawton

    8 months ago
    Thumbnail jazzminelawton

    We’re running a series of short interviews with Mississauga’s cultural thought leaders. We want to know what they think makes the city unique and how they are helping to move culture forward in Mississauga.

    This week, we chat with the woman behind Youth Troopers for Global Awareness.


    Tell us a little bit about yourself.

    JL: My name is Jazzmine Lawton and I am the Executive Director at YTGA, Youth Troopers for Global Awareness.

    We are a non-profit organization empowering and mobilizing youth to address local and global social justice issues using the arts as... Continue reading

    We’re running a series of short interviews with Mississauga’s cultural thought leaders. We want to know what they think makes the city unique and how they are helping to move culture forward in Mississauga.

    This week, we chat with the woman behind Youth Troopers for Global Awareness.


    Tell us a little bit about yourself.

    JL: My name is Jazzmine Lawton and I am the Executive Director at YTGA, Youth Troopers for Global Awareness.

    We are a non-profit organization empowering and mobilizing youth to address local and global social justice issues using the arts as their platform of advocacy. We operate out of Studio.89, our social enterprise fair trade café and community hub offering free, safe space for events, workshops and resources. I have been with YTGA for just about 6 months now and absolutely love my job. I come from a background in event and project management, having worked for multiple non-profits and non-government organizations throughout Canada, Ghana and India. YTGA connects two of my greatest values: social justice activism and youth leadership. Our young people are our future leaders, let’s mobilize them to bring good to humans, animals and our planet.

    What makes Mississauga unique?

    JL: I grew up in Mississauga and although I kept leaving, something always brought me back. The diverse community and formative youth are what has turned Mississauga into the city it is today, and it’s quickly growing into an urban innovation and arts hub with our evolving city centre. Mississauga is unique because it is the people who live within its borders who have shaped it to what it is today. I remember the City Centre being nothing but a small mall, now it’s thriving with small business and innovation, and access to tremendous arts and culture!

    How would you make arts, culture and heritage better in the city?

    JL: Studio.89 is constantly making innovative strides towards more community programming that covers social justice, environmental, and arts topics that are accessible to all demographics complimentary. We believe that when the tools and resources needed to succeed are easily accessible to the community, especially youth, we see happier cities, more leaders, and strong economies.

    In 10 years, what will arts, culture and heritage look like in Mississauga?

    JL: The city will be overflowing with opportunity for artists, non-profits, young professionals and social entrepreneurs. Arts and culture will be linked to everyday activities, from a walk to the grocery story to a ride on MiWay. Our community will be inspired by every step they take, feel supported in learning new skills and thrive from resources easily available within the city.

    How is your organization helping to push arts and culture forward in Mississauga?

    JL: Studio.89 is constantly pushing the boundaries by using arts and culture as a tool for tackling both minor and major social justice issues within our own community and around the world. We use the arts as a tool to influence and inspire others, to bring a voice to those who feel they don’t have one, and empower by providing a platform for the community to implement projects that aim to support humans, animals and the planet.