Pedestrian Master Plan

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The City of Mississauga has completed the Pedestrian Master Plan. Read the plan

The study began with a Notice of Commencement on September 15, 2020 and a virtual Public Information Centre on November 12, 2020. The Pedestrian Master Plan satisfied Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class EA process. Interested persons may provide written comments by September 30, 2021. All comments and concerns should be sent directly to jacqueline.hunter@mississauga.ca.


About the project

Walking is a part of everyday life and is an efficient, cost effective and healthy way to travel around Mississauga. The City of Mississauga is developing its first ever Pedestrian Master Plan. The plan will shape how pedestrian connections are designed and implemented across our neighbourhoods, helping to enhance and create safe places for people to walk in Mississauga. The plan will act as a go-to reference for pedestrian infrastructure projects until 2041, supporting the City's commitment to a Vision Zero approach.

The project will:

  • review the City's existing pedestrian network, identifying gaps and opportunities for future infrastructure projects
  • identify key destinations for pedestrians (e.g. transit stops, schools, local amenities etc.)
  • analyse how growth and intensification will impact existing and future pedestrian infrastructure
  • set short, medium and long-term service delivery and project priorities
  • review best practices of pedestrian infrastructure and network design

The Pedestrian Master Plan project is being led by the City of Mississauga. A consultant team led by Urban Systems and supported by Dilion Consulting is providing specialized expertise in active transportation and community engagement.


Have your say

Help us make Mississauga a great place to walk! Get involved and share your thoughts using the tools below.


The City of Mississauga has completed the Pedestrian Master Plan. Read the plan

The study began with a Notice of Commencement on September 15, 2020 and a virtual Public Information Centre on November 12, 2020. The Pedestrian Master Plan satisfied Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class EA process. Interested persons may provide written comments by September 30, 2021. All comments and concerns should be sent directly to jacqueline.hunter@mississauga.ca.


About the project

Walking is a part of everyday life and is an efficient, cost effective and healthy way to travel around Mississauga. The City of Mississauga is developing its first ever Pedestrian Master Plan. The plan will shape how pedestrian connections are designed and implemented across our neighbourhoods, helping to enhance and create safe places for people to walk in Mississauga. The plan will act as a go-to reference for pedestrian infrastructure projects until 2041, supporting the City's commitment to a Vision Zero approach.

The project will:

  • review the City's existing pedestrian network, identifying gaps and opportunities for future infrastructure projects
  • identify key destinations for pedestrians (e.g. transit stops, schools, local amenities etc.)
  • analyse how growth and intensification will impact existing and future pedestrian infrastructure
  • set short, medium and long-term service delivery and project priorities
  • review best practices of pedestrian infrastructure and network design

The Pedestrian Master Plan project is being led by the City of Mississauga. A consultant team led by Urban Systems and supported by Dilion Consulting is providing specialized expertise in active transportation and community engagement.


Have your say

Help us make Mississauga a great place to walk! Get involved and share your thoughts using the tools below.

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A pedestrian master plan is desperately needed for the City of Mississauga. I support improved pedestrian and cyclist experiences. We must transition away from cars if we want to have a future on this planet.

AS 27 days ago

Their are so many racing cars that speed through neighborhoods. We Need TRAFFIC CALMING way more speed bumps, chicanes, lower speed limits. I care just raced by me writing this in Port Credit I'm not even joking.

J 3 months ago

Ninth Line is begging for an extension of the in boulevard bike lanes that currently run north of Derry and north of Britannia. Just need to extend that multi-use path all the way down to Eglinton

Lower base line is heavily used by bikers all the way to 5th line. It lacks a basic bike lane and forces riders to brakelybrisk life and limb to reside beside live traffic with inches to spare. Drivers have to patiently drive in the wrong lane to pass safely. A very popular area for many bikers , I suggest a survey of use be done. It would highlight how many riders frequent this area and the urgent need fir a small but very important investment in safely required to reduce risk of serious injury or fatal events along this stretch of provincial roadway.

21cChurchillJames 3 months ago

Based on successful strategies in livable cities such as Vancouver, Montreal and other pedestrian friendly areas, the best pedestrian friendly master plans seem to be organized around general micro mobility strategies based at multi-modal mobility frameworks. They incorporate foot and unpowered traffic path ways, priority access for pedestrians, bikes and other forms of micro- mobility , traffic signage and smart lights, engage BIAs factor in destinations and experienced as well as interlocks with public and or shared transit.

21cChurchillJames 3 months ago

Ttraffic lights for pedestrians along Dixie road (crossing at all four points at Burnhamthorpe, Golden Orchard, Winding Trail, and Dundas street) are TOO short for those of us with mobility issues to safely cross (20-25 seconds to cross? Seriously? For at times a SIX lane roadway?) this is impossible to do in the middle of winter, and barely doable currently. (especially when you have to account for cars that do not wait for you to cross and almost RUN YOU OVER when you have right of way). The cross times NEED to be longer for pedestrians to safely get from one side of the streets to the other. on ALL four corners.

AeliaWyndsong 4 months ago

Ninth line from Britannia Rd. to Thomas St. there is no side walk at all plus crossing Raftsman Cove to be done like Churchill Meadows Blvd. on Green belt Diviner's Way

Dopcio 7 months ago

Pedestrian access to Marie Curtis Park is lacking. Most times we have to walk among the cars, through the bushes or access the park via Etobicoke Creek. Also, to cross some streets it's confusing and you have to cross it two times to get to where you want to go. The sidewalks lack visual interest: pretty trees, landscaping, interesting shops. On Lakeview Village there is very little you can walk to.

ppgm 8 months ago

Many people have complained about what I going to write about here (myself included) and that is pedestrian crosswalks in the Village of Port Credit ... Especially between HuronOntario and Mississauga Rd, on Lakeshore Rd E/W. One at Helene St and another one at Front St and Lakeshore Rd W notwithstanding the traffic lights in both areas. The crosswalks will be the same as recently established in the Villege of Oakville (bite my tongue) This will mean a person from the Planning Office will have to make a site visit to Oakville to observe how pedestrian/traffic efficient and friendly they are. There is no shame to copy especially if the copy is a superior in design to the norm.

donjulien2021 8 months ago

Thank you for making Mississauga a more walkable city. I live in Susex area, probably the most walkable part fo Mississauga and here are some reasons why I still use a car most of the time rather than walk:
- the streets are too wide (as a pedestrian I feel exposed, dominated by and endangered by cars)
- retail is inset too far from the street (when walking I like to window shop. Where there is no retail at street level I don't feel compelled to walk around)
- not enough unique interesting businesses (Square One area is all franchises, not unique local businesses. These businesses are also to come and leave oriented. In a franchise, I pick up the food and leave, i doesn't compel me to sit around and walk around. We need more galleries, theatres, interesting arts and crafts business like in Port Credit at street level downtown Mississauga)
- landlords are not friendly to small local businesses (commercial leases in downtown Mississauga are higher than most of Toronto, one can rent a storefront on Danforth at one third of a price of a downtown Mississauga retail space. That makes no sense! Also, if a small local business like a gallery wants to rent downtown Mississauga the landlord won't lease to them. We need a city mandated % of space in every downtown tower to be mandated as not profit rent to attract galleries, small independent cupcake stores, craft studios, theatres, dance studios..., the presence of these types of bossinesses will increase walkability)
- We need more street benches, garbage bins and interactive public art

Andreja 8 months ago

Better signaled intersections. For intersections where there a reasonable amount of pedestrian traffic, have the pedestrian signal come on any time the light turns green (ie. without pressing the button). On other intersections, if the pedestrian signal was not pressed but the light turns green, allow the pedestrian signal to switch to walk if someone presses the button. This just encourages pedestrians to race the light (or otherwise wait for the signal to turn red and then green again). Most important: Have the pedestrian signal turn to walk *before* the green signal - this allows pedestrians to clearly make their intentions and talk the crosswalk before cars try to make right or left turns.

eclose 11 months ago

I wanted to ask 1 question. If the City is planning for future expecting more people walking, bicycling should be banned from side walks. My daughter was hit hard on side walk.
Second suggestion is to make registration of bicycle so that owners can be traced.

Sunil Kapoor 11 months ago

Spending for transportation in this order: Cycling, Pedestrian and way down at the bottom of the pile roadways. I love my car but I want my family and I to spend more time out and about going to school, work, shopping with our bikes and legs. I despise seeing so so much money spent on bigger wider faster roadways and so little action on any other options. Suggestion, repair 1 kilometre of road add 2-3 kilometres of sidewalks and cycling infra. What's the lifetime of a typical asphalt paved road, I'm sure it's got to be 1/5th that of sidewalk... seems to me a sidewalk is a better investment.

WL 11 months ago

he pedestrian beg buttons along lakeshore are dehumanizing. Having one side of the road give the walk signal but the other side the hand because I didn't get there in time to press the button on that side of the street makes me feel like a much lesser being for not having wheels. Ban the beg button! So what if cars have to wait a few more minutes. If this plan is serious there will be much more pedestrian activity anyways and the beg buttons will no longer be necessary because the walk signs will be on auto to facilitate safe crossing.

suepriffic 12 months ago

Please consider extending the Lisgar Meadow Brook Trail so that it continues on both sides of the creek the entire length as opposed to switching back and forth, this would allow the opportunity to loop through out the trail to allow for different lengths as well as ease some of the congestion that has arisen due to Covid 19 and people walking/cycling. Also better signage so cyclists yield to pedestrians and ring their bell, there are some hidden parts of the trail and I have almost been hit several times now by cyclists going to fast & not paying attention to pedestrians.

Ikemper 12 months ago

Lots of small, easy things the city can do to improve the pedestrian environment. A few suggestions for Cooksville and beyond::
- PEDESTRIAN SCALE LIGHTING: Ensures that pedestrians are visible to motorists and illuminates potential tripping hazards.
- PEDESTRIAN SIGNALS: I always see pedestrians dangerously trying to cross Dundas (and other roads) in the middle of the road because the distance between traffic lights is too great. Traffic control signals that provide pedestrians with a protected crossing opportunity midblock by requiring motorists to stop at the signal would greatly improve the pedestrian environment.
- SHOPS FRONTING SIDEWALKS: It doesn't matter how good the sidewalks are if pedestrians have to walk across parking lots to get to their destination. New construction along major roads should put parking at the back of the building or underground, not out in front! For example, why on earth did the city authorize construction of ANOTHER strip mall at 3064 Hurontario St? Strip malls (and pigeons) are the Cancer of Cooksville!

Vince from Cooksville 12 months ago

A separate walking lane for cyclists, pls!!!

Joanna from Port Credit 12 months ago

I am very concerned about the safety to pedestrians on mixed use paths with pedestrians and cyclists, especially on the busy paths in lakeside parks. Many cyclists travel in groups and are generally traveling very quickly along the paths. Pedestrians could easily be hit or knocked over by the cyclists. A separate designated lane for cyclists should be established and in busy parks and waterfront paths the cyclists should be required to walk their bike if they don’t follow the designated cycle path.

Kimberly.F 12 months ago

As a daily walker in the Lake Aquatane Park I have seen some very dangerous areas in the path. Some areas have gouged out pieces and generally not the safest walk for some seniors who suffer from lessened balance. A good look would be very worthwhile to improve its safety. Thank you.

treegord 12 months ago

I believe that these days we need a critical plan to deal with pedestrian and cycling safety.
In an ideal world i imagine city streets where the cars are our last priority.
Pedestrians first, Cyclists second and then cars.
It actually works that way in some european towns where cars stop for you any time they see you even looking to cross. I know it is a dream... and will take decades ... but it can be done if we all accept it as necessary!

Mike Kibsey 12 months ago

The planned trail location at Premium way and Dickson rd. will be next to an above ground valve compound that I understand will have a large, high fence. This could pose as a visual obstruction to cars, pedestrians and rollers of all types.

Concerned about 1 year ago
Page last updated: 27 August 2021, 08:56